Buddhism is the world’s fourth – karma – Buddhist meditation.

Buddhism
Buddhism
karma

Buddhism is the world’s fourth-largest religion in the world. Karma. 

Buddhism –  karma, Buddhist meditation

The evidence of the early texts suggests that he was born as Siddhārtha Gautama in Lumbini and grew up in Kapilavasthu,[note 2] a town in the plains region of the modern Nepal-India border, and that he spent his life in what is now modern Bihar[note 3] and Uttar Pradesh.[25][17] Some hagiographic legends state that his father was a king named Suddhodana, his mother was Queen Maya, and he was born in Lumbini gardens.[26]However, scholars such as Richard Gombrich consider this a dubious claim because a combination of evidence suggests he was born in the Shakyas community – one that later gave him the title Shakyamuni, and the Shakya community was governed by a small oligarchy or republic-like council where there were no ranks but where seniority mattered instead.[27][note 4] Some of the stories about Buddha, his life, his teachings, and claims about the society he grew up in may have been invented and interpolated at a later time into the Buddhist texts.[30][31]

stone relief sculpture of horse and men

 

“The Great Departure”, relic depicting Gautama leaving home, first or second century (Musée Guimet)

According to the Buddhist sutras, Gautama was moved by the innate suffering of humanity and its endless repetition due to rebirth. He set out on a quest to end this repeated suffering. Early Buddhist canonical texts and early biographies of Gautama state that Gautama first studied under Vedic teachers, namely Alara Kalama (Sanskrit: Arada Kalama) and Uddaka Ramaputta (Sanskrit: Udraka Ramaputra), learning meditation and ancient philosophies, particularly the concept of “nothingness, emptiness” from the former, and “what is neither seen nor unseen” from the latter

 

The gilded “Emaciated Buddha statue” in an Ubosoth in Bangkok representing the stage of his asceticism

Finding these teachings to be insufficient to attain his goal, he turned to the practice of asceticism. This too fell short of attaining his goal, and then he turned to the practice of dhyana, meditation, which he had already discovered in his youth. He famously sat in meditation under a Ficus religiosa tree now called the Bodhi Tree in the town of Bodh Gayain the Gangetic plains region of South Asia. He gained insight into the workings of karma and his former lives, and attained enlightenment, certainty about the Middle Way (Skt. madhyamā-pratipad)[36] as the right path of spiritual practice to end suffering (dukkha) from rebirths in Saṃsāra.[37] As a fully enlightened Buddha (Skt. samyaksaṃbuddha), he attracted followers and founded a Sangha (monastic order).[38] Now, as the Buddha, he spent the rest of his life teaching the Dharma he had discovered, and died at the age of 80 in Kushinagar, India.[39][20]

Buddha’s teachings were propagated by his followers, which in the last centuries of the 1st millennium BCE became over 18 Buddhist sub-schools of thought, each with its own basket of texts containing different interpretations and authentic teachings of the Buddha;[40][41][42] these over time evolved into many traditions of which the more well known and widespread in the modern era are TheravadaMahayana and VajrayanaB.[43][44][note 6]

The problems of life: dukkha and saṃsāra

Four Noble Truths – dukkha and its ending

color manuscript illustration of Buddha teaching the Four Noble Truths, Nalanda, Bihar, India

 

The Buddha teaching the Four Noble Truths. Sanskrit manuscript. Nalanda, Bihar, India.

The Four Truths express the basic orientation we crave and cling to impermanent states and things, which is dukkha, “incapable of satisfying” and painful.[47][48] This keeps us caught in saṃsāra, the endless cycle of repeated rebirth, dukkha and dying again.[note 7] But there is a way to liberation from this endless cycle[54] to the state of nirvana, namely following the Noble Eightfold Path.[note 8]

The truth of dukkha is the basic insight that life in this mundane world, with its clinging and craving to impermanent states and things[47] is dukkha, and unsatisfactory.[49][60][web 2] Dukkha can be translated as “incapable of satisfying,”[web 6] “the unsatisfactory nature and the general insecurity of all conditioned phenomena“; or “painful.”[47][48] Dukkha is most commonly translated as “suffering,” but this is inaccurate, since it refers not to episodic suffering, but to the intrinsically unsatisfactory nature of temporary states and things, including pleasant but temporary experiences.[note 9] We expect happiness from states and things which are impermanent, and therefore cannot attain real happiness.

Dukkha arises when we crave (Pali: tanha) and cling to these changing phenomena. The clinging and craving produces karma, which ties us to samsara, the round of death and rebirth.[73][web 7][note 10] Craving includes kama-tanha, craving for sense-pleasures; bhava-tanha, craving to continue the cycle of life and death, including rebirth; and vibhava-tanha, craving to not experience the world and painful feelings.[73][74][75]

Dukkha ceases, or can be confined,[76] when craving and clinging cease or are confined. This also means that no more karma is being produced, and rebirth ends.[note 11] Cessation is nirvana, “blowing out,” and peace of mind.[78][79]

By following the Buddhist path to moksha, liberation,[56] one starts to disengage from craving and clinging to impermanent states and things. The term “path” is usually taken to mean the Noble Eightfold Path, but other versions of “the path” can also be found in the Nikayas.[80] The Theravada tradition regards insight into the four truths as liberating in itself.[62]

The cycle of rebirth

Traditional Tibetan Buddhist Thangka depicting the Wheel of Life
Buddhism

Saṃsāra

 

A very large hill behind two palm trees and a boulevard, where the Buddha is believed to have been cremated

 

Ramabhar Stupa in KushinagarUttar PradeshIndia is regionally believed to be Buddha’s cremation site.

Rebirth refers to a process whereby beings go through a succession of lifetimes as one of many possible forms of sentient life, each running from conception to death.[93] In Buddhist thought, this rebirth does not involve any soul, because of its doctrine of anattā (Sanskrit: anātman, no-self doctrine) which rejects the concepts of a permanent self or an unchanging, eternal soul, as it is called in Hinduism and Christianity.[94] According to uddhism there ultimately is no such thing as a self in any being or any essence in any thing.[95]

 Traditions have traditionally disagreed on what it is in a person that is reborn, as well as how quickly the rebirth occurs after each death.[96][97] Some Buddhist traditions assert that “no self” doctrine means that there is no perduring self, but there is avacya (inexpressible) self which migrates from one life to another.[96] The majority of Buddhist traditions, in contrast, assert that vijñāna (a person’s consciousness) though evolving, exists as a continuum and is the mechanistic basis of what undergoes rebirth, rebecoming and redeath.[49][96] The rebirth depends on the merit or demerit gained by one’s karma, as well as that accrued on one’s behalf by a family member.[note 13]

Each rebirth takes place within one of five realms according to Theravadins, or six according to other schools – heavenly, demi-gods, humans, animals, hungry ghosts and hellish.[99][100][note 14]

In East Asian and Tibetan rebirth is not instantaneous, and there is an intermediate state (Tibetan “bardo“) between one life and the next.[110][111] The orthodox Theravada position rejects the wait, and asserts that rebirth of a being is immediate.[110]However there are passages in the Samyutta Nikaya of the Pali Canon that seem to lend support to the idea that the Buddha taught about an intermediate stage between one life and the next.[

Karma v Buddhist meditation. 

 karma (from Sanskrit: “action, work”) drives saṃsāra – the endless cycle of suffering and rebirth for each being. Good, skilful deeds (Pāli: kusala) and bad, unskilful deeds (Pāli: akusala) produce “seeds” in the unconscious receptacle (ālaya) that mature later either in this life or in a subsequent rebirth.[114][115] The existence of karma is a core belief has with all major Indian religions, it implies neither fatalism nor that everything that happens to a person is caused by karma.[116][note 15]

A central aspect of theory of karma is that intent (cetanā) matters and is essential to bring about a consequence or phala “fruit” or vipāka “result”.[117][note 16] However, good or bad karma accumulates even if there is no physical action, and just having ill or good thoughts creates karmic seeds; thus, actions of body, speech or mind all lead to karmic seeds.[116] In the Buddhist traditions, life aspects affected by the law of karma in past and current births of a being include the form of rebirth, realm of rebirth, social class, character and major circumstances of a lifetime.[

A notable aspect of the karma theory in is merit transfer.[124][125] A person accumulates merit not only

karma
karma
karma
Asana
For other uses, see Asana (disambiguation). Asanas in varied contexts. Left to right, top to bottom: Eka Pada Chakrasana; Ardha Matsyendrasana; Padmasana; Navasana; Pincha Mayurasana; Dhanurasana; Natarajasana; Vrkshasana In yoga, an asana is a body posture, originally sitting for meditation,[1] but more generally for hatha yoga or yoga as exercise, …

Buddhism
Buddhist meditation
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buddhist meditation

Buddhist meditation
meditation
meditation
Buddhist meditation
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Karma – Wikipedia
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